Colombian Coffee

Colombia coffee reviews tend to note it as medium-bodied with a rich taste and citrus-like acidity. The best high-grown Colombian coffee typifies the classic Latin American mild, fruity flavor though not the type of fruity taste that seems almost fermented. Colombian coffees are known for being smooth and easy-drinking, which makes them ideal for mellowing out overbearing flavors in some other countries. Due to a wide variety of varietals and growing regions within Colombia, it’s difficult to peg down exactly which flavors you’ll get from any single origin Colombian coffee, but there are some patterns that repeat. Sweet chocolatey flavors are very prominent in most, with some fruity notes that can touch on caramel, apple and red fruits like berries. The Colombian aromas tend to be a little citrusy and fruity at times, have hints of spice – like Indian Coffee this regard

Roastery Coffee colombia
Colombian Arabica

The high volume of crops grown in the country (Colombia grew almost 10% of the coffee in the entire world in 2015) means that these premium Arabica beans are also some of the most aggressively priced on the market, and serve as a base for many brands’ blends. The drawback to how common these beans are is that many people will find them very “mild” as they’re used to the flavor.

Most standard Colombian coffee is grown by relatively small farms and then collected, wet-processed (washed), milled, and exported by the Colombian Coffee Federation. Growing elevations in Colombia range from 1,200 meters to 1,800 meters above sea level, offering plenty of opportunity for highly rated Strictly High Grown Colombian coffees to be found. Colombian coffees are typically washed and sun dried on patios.

Because of the sheer geographic size of Colombia, the harvest season varies depending on the part of the country, with most crops being harvested between September and January, but some parts happen from April to August. The consistent output leads to more stable prices and a constant supply of Colombian green coffees to the North American market.

Three of Colombia’s most distinguished coffees—Medellin, Armenia, and Manizales are named after the region in which they were grown and then often marketed together in order to simplify the transfers of large coffee contracts. These coffees are known by the acronym MAM.

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